Tag Archives: Reading

Reading Materials: September 2017

Sorry this is late! I barely know what day it is.

44. Ross Poldark, Winston Graham. (Library) A friend recommended the PBS series Poldark to me, and I’ve become mildly obsessed. When I learned that it was based on a very popular series of books from the 1940s, I decided to give the first one a try. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it. It has aged well, and the writing still feels fresh and sharp. The story is set immediately after the American Revolutionary War, but it takes place in England, in Cornwall. This is a time/place combination which I had not spent much time thinking about, so I was glad for some historical perspective as well as a great story. I’ve already put the second book in this 12-book series on hold at the library.

45. Every Dead Thing, John Connolly. (Library) John Connolly frequently pops up on “authors you may like” lists for me, so I decided to give one a try. It’s set in New York and New Orleans, which appealed to me as well. I liked the book, although I guessed the twist pretty early on, and I got a little tired of Connolly’s insistence on detailing the weight/fitness level/attire of every character. I am not rushing out to the library to get the next book in the series, but I may pick it up later.

46. The Secret Diary of Hendrick Groen, Aged 83 1/4. (Library, book club selection) This was a hard book to read. My mother spent almost two years in an assisted living facility, and it was informational to read about nursing home care in other countries. But I just couldn’t get into this character. The book spends a lot of time discussing the merits of assisted suicide, which cut a little too close for me right now.

47. Phantom Evil, Heather Graham. (Library) I must have some Puritan blood in me, because I have very little tolerance for novels in which attractive-yet-broken people solve all interpersonal drama through mind-blowing sex. Or, worse, when two attractive-yet-broken people are put in mortal peril, and the first thing they do afterwards is…. you guessed it. Other than that, this story was good. It’s another New Orleans story, which you know I’m always down for. It seems to be based in part on the lore surrounding the Lalaurie mansion in the French Quarter, in that it features a big, beautiful mansion that’s haunted/cursed.

48. The Round House, Louise Erdlich. (Library) This has been on my to-read list for a while, so when I espied it on the library shelf I picked it up. It follows the aftermath of a horrific crime perpetrated on a Native American family. The writing was tremendous, the characters well-developed, and the plot was interesting. I enjoyed reading it.

49. Panacea, F. Paul Wilson. (Library) I have been a fan of Wilson’s since a friend lent me the Repairman Jack series, which is outstanding. This book is similarly engaging. It’s got Dan-Brown-style pacing. I read it during a very difficult week, and it managed to distract me for several minutes at a time.

2017 Totals
Fiction: 42
Non-Fiction: 7

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Reading Materials: July 2017

33. Bird Box, Josh Malerman. (Library) This was billed as a horror novel, but it was better than that label. It was chilling and creepy. It reminded me of The Walking Dead in that the main characters are facing a threat that is not actively malicious, but still very dangerous. I can’t even really explain the “monsters,” because the book never fully explains them. This is not a flaw – I think sketching them with a minimum of detail keeps the situation creepier. I enjoyed this read.

34. Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet, H.P. Wood. (Library) A pretty decent read about carnival workers on Coney Island at the turn of the century, and a young English girl who gets separated from her family and has to use her wits (and her newfound carnie friends) to stay safe. Meanwhile, there’s an outbreak of plague. This book was aggressively fine, but also reduced many characters to two-dimensional cutouts.

35. News of the World, Paulette Jiles. (Library) Despite the author’s incredibly annoying lack of quotation marks around all dialogue in this book, I really enjoyed it. Don’t dismiss it because it’s “a Western.”  For the record, I resisted reading Lonesome Dove for many years, because it was “a Western.” Shame on me. The writing is beautiful – expansive like the swaths of country it describes. This is a lovely little book.

36. Searching for Sunday: Loving, Leaving, and Finding the Church, Rachel Held Evans. (Borrowed for Book Club) This book describes one woman’s personal journey from an evangelical upbringing, through a time in the spiritual wilderness, and finally landing in the arms of the Episcopal church. It is divided into seven sections, each named for one of the sacraments of that church. I enjoyed the writing, and the honesty with which Evans wrestled with her faith. My only complaint is this: When one talks about sin, and confession, it is traditionally understood to mean examining oneself for deficiencies and naming them before God. Victimhood, on the other hand, is devoted to examining and naming the sins of others. Too often in this book, Evans substitutes victims for sinners, and the only sin she names in herself is a tendency to dislike Republicans. For example, in a gathering she calls one of the most spiritually profound experiences of her life, a group of gay Christians tells their personal stories of persecution. These are powerful stories, and deserve to be told – but they are not confession. They are testimony, or witness. Anyway, this is a minor quibble with the book, which I overall enjoyed.

37. Trigger Warning, Neil Gaiman. (Library, Book Club) I have always wanted to love Neil Gaiman. He has a strong cult following of people whose opinions I value. I read The Ocean at the End of the Lane, and it was…fine. I started Stardust, but some asshat had removed the last page of each chapter, so I abandoned it after a few chapters and never sought out another copy. I watched Coraline. This collection, however, was very good. It shows an excellent range of storytelling ability. I could probably do without the poetry, but only because it looked like artfully-arranged prose. I think my problem with Gaiman is that so many authors have derived from him that the original material seems a little cliched. I felt the same way when I read The Lord of the Rings trilogy as an adult.

38. Sweet Bitter, Stephanie Danler. (Library) Critics of this book characterize it as “exactly what you’d expect from a new MFA graduate,” and they’re probably right. Nevertheless, I couldn’t put it down. It follows Tess through her heady first year in New York City, as a backwaiter at an upscale restaurant. Her life becomes a trainwreck – but one you can’t stop watching.

2017 Totals
Fiction: 32
Non-Fiction: 6

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Reading Materials: June 2017

28. Rabbit Cake, Annie Hartnett. (Library, Book Club Selection) I actually read this in May and forgot to include it in last month’s list. Ooooops. This book reminded me of Tell the Wolves I’m Home, in that it dealt with grief from the perspective of a younger girl with an older sister. This was a thoughtful book – it’s hard to write like a child, to capture the feeling of being young.

29. Welcome to Night Vale, Joseph Fink. (Borrowed from Tyler) This is a weird book – I mean, WEIRD – yet also delightful and filled with unexpectedly beautiful moments. In what was a we-live-in-the-future first for me, Welcome to Night Vale started as a podcast and was later made into a book. It follows a fictional town in the desert where nothing is normal. It’s as though one of The X-Files‘ signature creepy small towns collided with an extraterrestrial location from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. I found this book a challenging, but rewarding, read. I find myself thinking about it frequently.

30. Dark Places, Gillian Flynn. (Borrowed) I enjoyed Gone Girl, and needed a bit of a palate cleanser after being immersed in Night Vale, so this fit the bill nicely. I enjoyed this twisty mystery, even if I found it difficult to like a single character.

31. The Lilac Girls, Martha Hall Kelly. (Borrowed) A sweeping WWII novel told from the perspective of three women – two of whom were real people. My only criticism is that one of the three narrators drops out of sight for most of the second half of the book, and I kept waiting for her name to appear on a chapter title. Overall, I thought this was well-written and engaging, and gets bonus points for some awesome French food descriptions.

32. Creating Your Dream Kitchen, Susan Breen. (Library) We’ve known since the day we bought our house that we wanted to completely remodel the kitchen. It was designed by a sadist who didn’t cook – there is zero counter space on either side of the slanty cook top, for example, and the cabinets are cavernous and un-shelved. Anyway, I want to design the new kitchen myself, so obviously the first thing I did was check out a book on the subject. (And pin a bunch of things in Pinterest, duh.) This was a very basic primer, but it did have some good inspiration photos. Alas, on a personally-aggravating note, it also had a bunch of typos. Grrrrrrrr.

2017 Totals
Fiction: 27
Non-Fiction: 5

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Reading Materials: January 2017

1. Breaking the Silence, Diane Chamberlain. (Digital library) This book was solidly fine. It was engaging, but not gripping. There were a lot of loose ends, and all of them were neatly tied up at the end – a bit too neatly for my taste. Some of the plot devices stretched believability, especially in the age of the internet. This must be a terrible time to write mysteries or shoot horror movies.

2. Love Warrior, Glennon Doyle Melton. (Received in conjunction with Women’s Connection Conference) Oooooooh boy. Let me start off by stating that I haaaaated Eat, Pray, Love, and have continued to be aggravated by memoirs of women who are, basically, Far Too Special To Cope With Reality. I have read both of Melton’s books, and I have seen her speak, and every chapter of hers I read sets off a tiny alarm bell. I simply do not trust her as a narrator. In fact, I might argue that the only absolutely true thing she’s written was, “I just love to shock people.” This is not to say that she is being willful about her narrative choices – I think she believes she is telling the whole, authentic truth (TM). My problem is that she has cultivated an internet following who will provide her a hit of sweet, sweet adulation any time she feels like gifting them with a Shocking Truth. Most of these truths can be summed up, “I’m a mess! Don’t judge!” When Elizabeth Gilbert (of Eat, Pray, Love fame) got divorced in her early 30s, she coped by going on a fully-funded round-the-world jaunt. Melton deals with her various problems by moving her family to a beachfront city, checking herself into a beachfront hotel for two days of “me time,” and picking up a daily yoga practice. Most women do not have the time or money to “cope” in these ways. Most women in crisis have to continue to slog along, going to work and caring for their kids while feeling embarrassed and upset and nauseated all the time. I’d like to read their stories. I do not believe that women like Melton are actually any more sensitive or special than women like me; rather, I think many women find comfort in a modicum of privacy and in relationships that are guarded by a low wall of discretion. Anyway, that got long. If you like Melton, and Brene Brown, and Oprah, you’ll love this. If you’re vaguely suspicious of them, you probably won’t.

3. Ready Player One, Ernest Cline. (Digital Library) This book was SO GOOD. As with The Martian, much of the appeal stems from the narrator, Wade Watts, who is funny and sharp. I grew up in the 1980s, so I enjoyed the wall-to-wall pop culture references. The story is a very traditional hero’s quest, dressed up in a tech-driven dystopian near-future. I found it particularly insightful in light of some recent conversations I’ve had with friends on the difference between one’s real life and the life one leads on social media. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book and am going to force my 13-year-old geek-culture-obsessed son to read it too.

4. The Red Umbrella, Christina Diaz Gonzales. (Middle school student-parent book club selection) This book draws on the experiences of Gonzales’ parents, who were children during the revolution in Cuba. Along with thousands of children, they were sent to the United States via Operation Pedro Pan. The experiences of these children, and the heartbreak of their parents, makes for a powerful story.

5. Cutting for Stone, Abraham Verghese. (Friends of the Library Book Sale) This book has been on my to-read list for years. I bought it last year at the library book sale, and it’s been calling to me from my shelves since then. It is a gorgeous read, beautifully written and completely immersive. I looked forward to every opportunity I got to pick it up. The book follows a set of identical twins, starting with their unexpected birth in Ethiopia. It is also a meditation on belonging and home – the twins are half-Indian, half-English, raised by an Indian couple in Ethiopia. But though they have no other home, they are reminded frequently that they are Other. Several reviewers on Goodreads remarked on their discomfort with descriptions of medical procedures, but they didn’t faze me. I loved learning about the practice of medicine in earlier times and different places. It was a great story with a side of History Channel. I will be keeping this book, which is rare for me these days.

6. The Great American House, Gil Schafer III. (Gift) Jason bought this book for me for Christmas, and I’ve been slowly reading it cover-to-cover. It’s a beautiful book, satisfyingly heavy and filled with beautiful photographs. The first half is about creating a home and the elements that go into making that home harmonious. The second comprises four case studies: two new construction homes that were designed to look and feel old, and two historic homes that were given new life – one as a renovation, one as a restoration. My biggest takeaway is that the principles of good design – proportion, rhythm, and line – do not change based on the style of architecture. You can look at a rustic farmhouse or a Greek revival mansion, and both will be pleasing to the eye because they follow the same underlying rules. I learned a lot and got a ton of inspiration for our house.

7. Dead as a Doornail, Charlaine Harris. (hand-me-down) After making my way through a coffee table book, my brain needed a Sookie Stackhouse break. I continue to adore these books.

2017 Totals
Fiction: 5
Non-Fiction: 2

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