Reading Materials: January 2017

1. Breaking the Silence, Diane Chamberlain. (Digital library) This book was solidly fine. It was engaging, but not gripping. There were a lot of loose ends, and all of them were neatly tied up at the end – a bit too neatly for my taste. Some of the plot devices stretched believability, especially in the age of the internet. This must be a terrible time to write mysteries or shoot horror movies.

2. Love Warrior, Glennon Doyle Melton. (Received in conjunction with Women’s Connection Conference) Oooooooh boy. Let me start off by stating that I haaaaated Eat, Pray, Love, and have continued to be aggravated by memoirs of women who are, basically, Far Too Special To Cope With Reality. I have read both of Melton’s books, and I have seen her speak, and every chapter of hers I read sets off a tiny alarm bell. I simply do not trust her as a narrator. In fact, I might argue that the only absolutely true thing she’s written was, “I just love to shock people.” This is not to say that she is being willful about her narrative choices – I think she believes she is telling the whole, authentic truth (TM). My problem is that she has cultivated an internet following who will provide her a hit of sweet, sweet adulation any time she feels like gifting them with a Shocking Truth. Most of these truths can be summed up, “I’m a mess! Don’t judge!” When Elizabeth Gilbert (of Eat, Pray, Love fame) got divorced in her early 30s, she coped by going on a fully-funded round-the-world jaunt. Melton deals with her various problems by moving her family to a beachfront city, checking herself into a beachfront hotel for two days of “me time,” and picking up a daily yoga practice. Most women do not have the time or money to “cope” in these ways. Most women in crisis have to continue to slog along, going to work and caring for their kids while feeling embarrassed and upset and nauseated all the time. I’d like to read their stories. I do not believe that women like Melton are actually any more sensitive or special than women like me; rather, I think many women find comfort in a modicum of privacy and in relationships that are guarded by a low wall of discretion. Anyway, that got long. If you like Melton, and Brene Brown, and Oprah, you’ll love this. If you’re vaguely suspicious of them, you probably won’t.

3. Ready Player One, Ernest Cline. (Digital Library) This book was SO GOOD. As with The Martian, much of the appeal stems from the narrator, Wade Watts, who is funny and sharp. I grew up in the 1980s, so I enjoyed the wall-to-wall pop culture references. The story is a very traditional hero’s quest, dressed up in a tech-driven dystopian near-future. I found it particularly insightful in light of some recent conversations I’ve had with friends on the difference between one’s real life and the life one leads on social media. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book and am going to force my 13-year-old geek-culture-obsessed son to read it too.

4. The Red Umbrella, Christina Diaz Gonzales. (Middle school student-parent book club selection) This book draws on the experiences of Gonzales’ parents, who were children during the revolution in Cuba. Along with thousands of children, they were sent to the United States via Operation Pedro Pan. The experiences of these children, and the heartbreak of their parents, makes for a powerful story.

5. Cutting for Stone, Abraham Verghese. (Friends of the Library Book Sale) This book has been on my to-read list for years. I bought it last year at the library book sale, and it’s been calling to me from my shelves since then. It is a gorgeous read, beautifully written and completely immersive. I looked forward to every opportunity I got to pick it up. The book follows a set of identical twins, starting with their unexpected birth in Ethiopia. It is also a meditation on belonging and home – the twins are half-Indian, half-English, raised by an Indian couple in Ethiopia. But though they have no other home, they are reminded frequently that they are Other. Several reviewers on Goodreads remarked on their discomfort with descriptions of medical procedures, but they didn’t faze me. I loved learning about the practice of medicine in earlier times and different places. It was a great story with a side of History Channel. I will be keeping this book, which is rare for me these days.

6. The Great American House, Gil Schafer III. (Gift) Jason bought this book for me for Christmas, and I’ve been slowly reading it cover-to-cover. It’s a beautiful book, satisfyingly heavy and filled with beautiful photographs. The first half is about creating a home and the elements that go into making that home harmonious. The second comprises four case studies: two new construction homes that were designed to look and feel old, and two historic homes that were given new life – one as a renovation, one as a restoration. My biggest takeaway is that the principles of good design – proportion, rhythm, and line – do not change based on the style of architecture. You can look at a rustic farmhouse or a Greek revival mansion, and both will be pleasing to the eye because they follow the same underlying rules. I learned a lot and got a ton of inspiration for our house.

7. Dead as a Doornail, Charlaine Harris. (hand-me-down) After making my way through a coffee table book, my brain needed a Sookie Stackhouse break. I continue to adore these books.

2017 Totals
Fiction: 5
Non-Fiction: 2

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